The New Work/Life World

As the light at the end of the pandemic tunnel begins to show itself, excitement is beginning to brew for what some call the “New Normal”.
The new work/life world business

The New Work/Life World

AS THE LIGHT AT THE END OF THE PANDEMIC TUNNEL BEGINS TO SHOW ITSELF, EXCITEMENT IS BEGINNING TO BREW FOR WHAT SOME CALL THE “NEW NORMAL”.

Central to this “New Normal” is technology. Technology which 20 or 30 years ago was predicted to improve work/life balance but actually worsened it (everyone is now reachable), may finally deliver on that prediction.

Technology now allows many individuals to work and meet from anywhere in the world, particularly their homes. Furthermore, it has also increased and normalized the ability to receive groceries, dry goods, meals, and virtually anything you need right to your door, no matter where you live. Among other changes, a move towards more affordable, rural living is occurring.

As such, in many ways, the “New Normal” is not really that “New” at all, but rather a reversal of the trend towards urbanization that began with industrialization 260 years ago.

“One of the big trends this year has been the rise of new wealth creators from startups and tech-led companies.”
― Anas Rahman Junaid, Hurun India

WHAT DOES THIS REALLY MEAN IN TERMS OF A WORK/LIFE BALANCE?

Of course, a trend towards working from home in the form of freelancers and sub-contractors was slowly developing prior to the pandemic, but the keyword is “slowly”. The same goes for home delivery. In addition, as individuals find themselves with more quality time (and Quiet time) the number of new technology-related business ideas have increased exponentially. In other words, the pandemic did not create this “New Normal” but it has sped it up by at least a decade and created what I hope will be an improved work/life balance for many people.

In respect to business, the impacts have been to allow many managers to realize their staff do not need to be babysat. The fact is that most productivity studies have shown a drastic improvement in productivity over the pandemic. This is in part due to an individuals’ ability to be working when they normally would be commuting, their being able to work whenever there is idle time regardless of whether it is in their 8-hr. window or not, and most importantly, because they are generally happier. Furthermore, many businesses are downscaling their office space requirements opting to have their employees work from home, or in part from home and part from the office. I suspect that a trend may also develop in which companies convert some employees to sub-contractors, thus not only saving on rental costs but also benefits, remittances, office supplies, etc.

In terms of the employees able to work from home, the impacts are more flexibility in their workday, more freedom and autonomy, much less stress, more enjoyment in the work they do, the ability to relocate to a more affordable area, less commuting and driving in general, no office politics, ability to lead a healthier life, and many more benefits. Individuals are flexible enough to organize their days in a way that works best for them and their families, as well as for the companies they work for.

I believe the pandemic has taught us that people can be responsible enough to get the job done more effectively and efficiently, while greatly improving their work/life balance.

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